Varias Posiciones científicas en NCI

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FYI ************************* Epidemiologist, Infections & Cancer, NCI (deadline: May 30) The new NCI Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch (IIB) in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) is recruiting for a tenure-track epidemiologist with experience and interest in the study of infectious agents and cancer risk. Research at the IIB focuses on understanding the causes and mechanisms involved in the development of tumors linked to infectious agents and in understanding the mechanisms underlying successful immune responses as they relate to cancer risk and to successful responses to vaccination. Both infectious and host immunological factors are considered in the context of human epidemiological studies. Studies undertaken by the group are often large, international and include rich biological specimen components to permit in-depth evaluation of biological processes, including immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, involved in tumor development using state-of-the-art techniques. The Branch houses the 7,500 woman community-based vaccine trial in Costa Rica designed to evaluate the efficacy and impact of a new HPV-16/18 virus-like particle vaccine and has an active set of studies aimed at evaluating the role of numerous infectious agents (including EBV, HIV, HPV, HTLV-1, and KHSV) and tumor sites (including cervical cancer, gastric cancer, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, lung cancer, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and oral/oropharyngeal cancers). Recent efforts have also begun to explore how the microbiome might affect immunity and long-term cancer risk. The successful candidate will receive research support from the intramural research program of NIH for conducting innovative studies aimed at elucidating the role of infectious agents in tumor development. Applicants must have an M.D. and/or Ph.D. in epidemiology or a related field, and considerable post-doctoral experience in cancer epidemiology, viral epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, microbial genomics and/or tumor immunology. A record of peer-reviewed publications in one of these fields is required. The successful candidate should have strong analytical/quantitative skills, a good understanding of biological processes, and a demonstrated ability to collaborate across disciplines. Strong oral and written communication skills are an important requirement. Applications will be evaluated on demonstrated ability to lead complex epidemiologic investigations; to develop a creative, independent program of epidemiological research applicable to understanding infectious determinants of cancer risk; and to collaborate effectively in a multidisciplinary setting. Interested individuals should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a brief summary of research experience, accomplishments and research interests and goals, copies of three publications or preprints, and three letters of reference to: Ms. Judy Schwadron; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; National Cancer Institute; 6120 Executive Blvd. EPS/8073; Bethesda, MD 20892. Candidates should submit applications by May 30, 2008; however, the search will continue until a qualified candidate is found. Additional information about staff and ongoing research in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and in the Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch is available at http://www.dceg.cancer.gov. Prospective applicants should send e-mail inquiries to Allan Hildesheim, Ph.D., Branch Chief (hildesha@exchange.nih.gov). Tenure-Track Investigator Immunoepidemiologist, NCI (deadline: May 30) The new NCI Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch (IIB) in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) is recruiting for a tenure-track epidemiologist with experience and interest in the study of immunology and cancer. Research at the IIB focuses on understanding the causes and mechanisms involved in the development of tumors linked to infectious agents and in understanding the mechanisms underlying successful immune responses as they relate to cancer risk and to successful responses to vaccination. Both infectious and host immunological factors are considered in the context of human epidemiological studies. Studies undertaken by the group are often large, international and include rich biological specimen components to permit in-depth evaluation of biological processes, including immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, involved in tumor development and vaccination responses using state-of-the-art techniques. The Branch has an active set of studies aimed at evaluating the role of numerous infectious agents (including EBV, HIV, HPV, HTLV-1, and KHSV) and tumor sites (including cervical cancer, gastric cancer, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, lung cancer, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and oral/oropharyngeal cancers). The Branch also houses the 7,500 woman community-based vaccine trial in Costa Rica designed to evaluate the efficacy and impact of a new HPV-16/18 virus-like particle vaccine, and an HPV immunology laboratory that complement field activities and allows interactive evaluation of hypotheses of immunological importance within our studies. The successful candidate will receive research support from the intramural research program of NIH for conducting innovative studies aimed at elucidating inflammatory and immunological mechanisms of HPV-related or other cancers and/or vaccine responses. Applicants must have an M.D. and/or Ph.D. in epidemiology or a related field, and considerable post-doctoral experience in cancer epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, and/or tumor or vaccine immunology. A record of peer-reviewed publications in one of these fields is required. The successful candidate should have strong analytical skills, a good understanding of biological/immunological processes, and a demonstrated ability to collaborate across disciplines. Strong oral and written communication skills are an important requirement. Applications will be evaluated on demonstrated ability to lead complex epidemiologic investigations; to develop a creative, independent program of epidemiological research applicable to understanding immune determinants of successful vaccination against cancer causing infections and/or immunological determinants of HPV-related or other cancers; and to collaborate effectively in a multidisciplinary setting. Interested individuals should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a brief summary of research experience, accomplishments and research interests and goals, copies of three publications or preprints, and three letters of reference to: Ms. Judy Schwadron; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; National Cancer Institute; 6120 Executive Blvd. EPS/8073; Bethesda, MD 20892. Candidates should submit applications by May 30, 2008; however, the search will continue until a qualified candidate is found. Additional information about staff and ongoing research in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and in the Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch is available at http://www.dceg.cancer.gov. Prospective applicants should send e-mail inquiries to Allan Hildesheim, Ph.D., Branch Chief (hildesha@exchange.nih.gov). DHHS and NIH are Equal Opportunity Employers. Program Director Cancer Stem Cell & Developmental Biology Program, NCI (deadline: May 30) The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking an outstanding scientist to serve as the first Director of the Cancer Stem Cell and Developmental Biology Program in the Center for Cancer Research (CCR). This is an exciting opportunity to establish a nationally recognized program in stem cell and developmental biology research. The Director will lead a collaborative community of investigators who are committed to advancing this field with the goal of fostering novel therapeutic approaches that target cancer stem cells. The program will be supported by a wide array of intellectual and technological resources, including dedicated, high quality technology cores relevant to stem cell biology, such as imaging/visualization (both in vitro and in vivo), in vitro stem cell assays, transgenic models, genetics, gene/drug delivery, FACS, proteomic analysis (including high-throughput mass spectrometry), and human genetics/bioinformatics. In addition, the cancer stem cell and developmental biology initiative will be supported with stable financial resources and a training program in cancer stem cell and developmental biology for talented post-doctoral fellows. The National Cancer Institute is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), a federal government agency. The Center for Cancer Research is the largest component of the intramural biomedical research effort at NIH. The research environment is collaborative and highly conducive to advancing translational research, emphasizing multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary team science. For more information go to: http://ccr.cancer.gov/default.asp. Applicants must have a Ph.D., M.D., or M.D. /Ph.D. degrees and a documented history of research success. Currently tenured faculty or faculty eligible for tenure at NIH, with a demonstrated commitment to stem cell biology, are encouraged to apply. Salary will be commensurate with experience and accomplishments. Applications should include: A letter indicating the position of interest including a statement of research interests; a career synopsis; and a current curriculum vitae and complete bibliography. Applications must be postmarked or received by email at hooperl@mail.nih.gov by May 30, 2008. Send applications to: Douglas Lowy, M.D., Chair, Cancer Stem Cell and Developmental Biology Program Search Committee, c/o Laura Hooper, Executive Secretary, Center for Cancer Research, 31 Center Drive, 31/3A11, MSC 2440, Bethesda, MD. 20892-2440.

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