Manuel Leal

Lizards "light up" their necks to communicate with each other

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A team of scientists, including Puerto Rican biologist Manuel Leal, discovered that Anolis lizards use the bagpipes on their necks to increase contrast against their surroundings to visually communicate with their species.

 

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Lizards use bioluminescent signals to communicate

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Dr. Manuel Leal and his colleagues published an article in the journal Functional Ecology about communication signals among lizards.

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Puerto Rican lizards adapt to Florida's weather

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Dr. Wilson González-Espada

Dr. Manuel Leal and collegueas from Duke University studied how the Puerto Rican lizard (Anolis cristatellus) has adapted to the weather in Florida. They estimated that it took approximately 35 evolutive generations to adjust to colder temperatures.

 

 

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Rapid Changes in Climate Don't Slow Some Lizards

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ScienceDaily (Nov. 26, 2012) — One tropical lizard's tolerance to cold is stiffer than scientists had suspected. A new study shows that the Puerto Rican lizard Anolis cristatellus has adapted to the cooler winters of Miami. The results also suggest that this lizard may be able to tolerate temperature variations caused by climate change.

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Overheated lizards – Radiocápsula Ciencia Puerto Rico

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The Puerto Rican lizard, "Anolis cristatellus", has two populations, one living in dry forests (Guánica, Aguirre, Boquerón and Ceiba) and one living in humid forests (Guajataca, Cambalache, La Vega and Mata de Plátano). Those living in dry forests are reaching their maximum temperature and could be a victim of climate change.

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A window into evolution

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A Caribbean lizard, a hurricane and a group of scientists that includes a Puerto Rican professor got "together" to help answer one of evolution's most fundamental questions. This article is part of Ciencia Puerto Rico's collaboration with El Nuevo Día.

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