Mónica Ivelisse Feliú-Mójer's blog

Puerto Rican ingenuity at the 2014 FIFA World Cup

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Puerto Rican neuroscientist and graduate student David Schwarz is part of Walk Again (Andar du Novo), a project that will allow a paraplegic Brazilian teen to control a robotic exoskeleton with their mind to execute the inaugural kick at the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

This event will be historical for many reasons. First, it is the culmination of years of research and the collective work of hundreds of scientists around the world, from engineers, to computer scientists, to neuroscientists.

Care about the future of science? Be visible.

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‘I am the girl that tweeted you’.

Elena found me on Twitter.  “I need your help,” she wrote.  I gave her my email.

Elena is an 8th grade student in Puerto Rico and her teacher had assigned students to profile a Puerto Rican scientist for a special project.  “You,” she wrote, “are my scientist.”

What's up, Borinqueña? Walking the talk: creating a better climate for women in science

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Borinqueña emphasizes the contribution of Puerto Rican and Hispanic women in science and technology and provides a space to discuss topics of interest about the empowerment of women.  In ‘What’s up Borinqueña?’ we share a variety of experiences and perspectives from different women and men that are committed to advancing equality for women in science.

Read this blog in Español here.


“Don’t worry.  You will get in.  You are a double minority.”

Why women leave science, you ask? THIS. This is why.

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[Puedes leer esta entrada en Español aquí]

Over the last 3 days or so, the science blogosphere has been a firestorm. Scientist, science writer and diversity advocate Dr. Danielle Lee aka The Urban Scientist aka @DNLee5 was attacked. She was attacked professionally and personally, in multiple ways.

Mentorship is golden

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“A mentor is somebody willing to fight for you the battles nobody else is willing to fight.” – Dr. Erika T. Camacho (who was mentored by THE Jaime Escalante) It could be said a good mentor is worth his or her weight in gold. A good mentor counsels, encourages, supports, guides, and listens, among many other things. Mentors can come in many shapes or forms. They can be family, friends, colleagues, teachers, professors, neighbors and even complete strangers.

Engaging Underrepresented Communities with Science Using Social Networking Platforms

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Although Hispanics comprise 16% of the total population in the United States, they remain largely underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers. 

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