conservación

Only two Puerto Rican parrots in El Yunque survived Hurricane Maria

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

The Associated Press

More than 50% of the population of Puerto Rican parrots, which is an endangered species, disappeared after Hurricane Maria destroyed its habitat and food source. Only two of the 60-65 birds who lived in El Yunque survived the category 4 storm.

You can read the full version of this article in Spanish by clicking on ESPAÑOL at the top right of your screen.

 

Tags: 

Para la Naturaleza and Boys & Girls Club Puerto Rico provide nature immersion experiences for youth

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

Gerardo E. Alvarado León

The non-profits Para la Naturaleza and Boys & Girls Club have partnered to provide nature immersion experiences for youth 6 to 18 years old.

You can read the full version of this article by clicking on ESPAÑOL at the top right of your screen.

Tags: 

Center for Coastal Conservation and Restoration celebrates 10th anniversary

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

Diálogo Digital

Vida Marina, the Center for Coastal Conservation and Restoration of the University of Puerto Rico at Aguadilla celebrates its 10th anniversary. This center had been distinguished for its commitment to educate the community through the conservation and ecological restoration of the northeast coast of Puerto Rico.

For the full article, please refer to the Spanish version of this site.

 

Tags: 

Species become extinct...so?

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

Diálogo Digital

Our planet's biodiversity is in danger, with many endangered species. What is the problem with these species dissapearing? 

This article discusses the consequences to our planet and explains why this should concern us.

For the full article, please refer to the spanish version of this site. 

Tags: 

James Ayala González: The Panda “Whisperer”

Wilson Javier Gonzalez-Espada's picture
James Ayala González
James Ayala González con un panda rojo

Por Dr. Wilson Gonzalez-Espada, Ciencia Puerto Rico


A well-known mathematics postulate states that: “Through any two points, there is exactly one straight line." Our reality, of course, is much more complicated than that. The life journey of a person is more like the curvy roads of PR-1, or “La Piquiña.”

A perfect example of this is scientist James Ayala González, who started his professional life as a jazz musician and today is a behavioral researcher at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Sichuan Province, Peoples Republic of China.

James was born just outside of Queens, New York City. His father, José Ayala Román, was originally from La Perla and his mother, Lourdes González Más, was a “Nuyorican” from the Bronx. Growing up in Jamaica Queens, James’ heart was divided between his two loves: science and music. “I would beg my parents to bring me to the Bronx Zoo, the NY Aquarium or the Museum of Natural History, so naturally I excelled at biology in grade school. However, I also had a deep love for music. In middle school, I began playing the saxophone and attending a special public high school music program to perform jazz.” By high school, James had put his interests in biology aside.

James attended Purchase College, part of the SUNY system, as a jazz performance major. “Jazz is one of the purest art forms, the freedom and expression of improvisation is without parallel. As a child, my father schooled me on the legends: Coltrane, Parker, Davis, Monk, Gillespie, Rollins, and Mingus. These were lessons I never forgot.”

DRNA alerts citizens of illegality of parking on riverbeds

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

Comunicado de Prensa

The Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DRNA) is warning citizens that it is illegal to park their cars on river shores. DRNA is also asking citizens to report this illegal activity by calling 787-724-5700 to inform rangers.

 

You can read the original full version of this article in Spanish by clicking on ESPAÑOL at the top right of your screen.

Tags: 

Authorities urge to protect the manatee

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

ELNUEVODIA.COM

Dr. Nilda Jiménez urged citizens to immediately notify authorities if they see a manatee that is trapped or hurt. 

People can call 787-724-5700. 

 

You can read the original full version of this article in Spanish by clicking on ESPAÑOL at the top right of your screen.

Tags: 

First leatherback sea turtle nest reported last week

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

DRNA

The DRNA reported the first leatherback sea turtle nest last week in Carolina.

To read the full article, visit the Spanish version of this site.

Tags: 

Puerto Rican Night Jar threatened by deforestation

This article is reproduced by CienciaPR with permission from the original source.

CienciaPR Contribution: 

No

By: 

ELNUEVODIA.COM

The Coalition Pro-Health and the Environment from de Susúa neighborhood in Sabana Grande and Arenas in Guánica warned about the threat that the construction of atenna towers represent for the Puerto Rican Night Jar's habitat. The Puerto Rican Night Jar is a critically endangered species.

 

The original version of this article is in Spanish. You can read it by clicking on ESPAÑOL at the top right of your screen.

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to conservación