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Sharing the science behind health, disease, and wellness



How does alcohol affect your brain?

Francis Heber Gonzalez's picture

Alcohol consumption has some benefits: helps us relax and generally makes us have a good time. But not everyone has the same relationship with alcohol. There are some people who are more affected by alcohol consumption than others, either because of genetic predispositions, the environment they grew up in or behaviors they observed. Although for some, the two or three drinks on a Friday is no more than an escape without much consequence, for others it can be a sentence to constant suffering.

"A liver of steel"

Francis Heber Gonzalez's picture

Some will feel the like their chest is going to pop out because someone has told them that they have a “liver of steel” during their career as professional drinkers. What you haven’t been told is that the origin of this saying is because the liver hardens and loses its function for those who abuse alcohol.  Because we only have one liver, once you damage it, there’s no plan B, YOU lost the game. It’s not like the kidneys which if you remove one, there’s still another one and you can receive dialysis to ameliorate the symptoms.  But many people take the comment a joke. Now I’ll explain what happens to your liver every time you go drinking and abuse alcohol.  

One more beer and then we go...

Francis Heber Gonzalez's picture

Today, April 7th, is Alcohol Screening Day. "Ugh!  Don’t sign me up for that one!  Alcoholism. What an ugly word!"  Yes, it is.  But the reality of life as an alcoholic or having a friend or family member suffering from this health condition is even uglier.  

Why does alcohol cause so much trouble and why is taboo to talk about alcoholism? After all, alcohol is a legal product and in Puerto Rico consumption often is glorified.

Monitoring your weight: An incentive for healthy eating

Christina Giselle Lopez's picture

Eating is great! No one can dispute that, but: What happens when we eat more than necessary? What happens when what we eat is of little nutritional value?

According to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),the rate of individuals overweight and obese worldwide has doubled between 1980 and 2014 and continues to grow (Fig 1). This path is primarily led by the United States, including Puerto Rico. Currently, 65.8% or two-thirds of the Puerto Rican population is considered overweight and 28.1% or close to one-third, is considered obese.

When menstruation hurts: Learn more about endometriosis

Idhaliz Flores Caldera's picture

For many women, menstruation is just a nuisance or discomfort. But for one in ten women this process is accompanied by inflammation and pelvic pain so severe that it affects the normal rhythm of their lives. These women are suffering from endometriosis, a condition characterized by dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation), dyspareunia (pain during intercourse), chronic, disabling pelvic pain, and often infertility.

 

Diabetes mellitus in Puerto Rico: opportunities to be discovered

Mainés Larissa Avilés Santa's picture

We’ve flirted with diabetes since the beginning of time, it has been part of our environment, and has become part of our family and our heritage. We live and die with it, it sits with us at the dinner table, at the beauty salon, on the bus, in the car, in the classroom, and in the office. And especially in those days, when we have no intention of walking or moving, that’s when it takes hold and doesn’t allow us to get out of our stupor.  We have accepted it as a natural companion in our daily lives, and often we realize that we have a guest when it suddenly steals the control out of our health and our lives. So diabetes, surname mellitus, is thus one of the oldest diseases of humanity.

Alzheimer's disease: We can reduce the risk

Irving Vega's picture

Recently, Dr. Irving Vega, Associate Professor at Michigan State University, presented his talk "Research on Alzheimer's disease: from bench to society". On the occasion of the "Brain Awareness Week" celebration, we share the video of his talk and an article written by Dr. Vega.  This is the first of multiple posts that we will be sharing with you this week exploring different conditions related to the health of our brain.

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Promoting early detection of Colorectal Cancer

Ricardo López Valle's picture

For many people, reaching the age of 50 marks the beginning of an important stage in their lives. Many take the opportunity to reflect on their experiences, achievements, and wishes to fulfill. But we should also recognize that no matter how young and full of energy we feel, it is natural that with age certain changes occur that affect the normal functioning of our body. This is why, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), every person should have a screening test for colorectal cancer starting at the age of 50.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. In Puerto Rico, it is the second most common type of cancer. It is also recognized as the second leading cause of cancer death for women, as well as the third cause for men.

Silence as an accomplice: Feeding and eating disorders

Mae Lynn Reyes-Rodriguez's picture

Traditionally, eating disorders have been considered  an issue for middle-upper class white females. However, we now know that these disorders do not discriminate by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age or gender.

What are feeding and eating disorders?

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